on board

Report about the cabins and kitchen of the Radboud, our three-master sailboat

The cabins on the boat were for two people and had a bathroom with toilet and shower each. The beds were normal, no hammocks, but rather small, only 90 by 180 cm.They were fixed to the wall. Some of us had to hang the feet out of bed.

We had to bring our own sleeping bags, but pillows and mattresses were on the boat. It was not very comfortable to sleep on the mattresses but it was possible. On, the last two nights the ship rocked us into sleep.

Every cabin had two scuttles, one at the slepping room and one at the bathroom, which could be opened. One day someone forgot to close the bullseyes and their bedclothes got wet.

The bathrooms were small. Our taller students had problems sitting on the toilet because the sinks were in the way. We had to clean everything ourselves.

In front of our bedrooms was a long corridor but in front of my bedroom was one of the poles and I ran against it at least two times and hit my head. Along the corridor was the kitchen, the dining room and one of the ways up.

 

I think the kitchen was rather big for a ship and equipped with modern things like a broken dishwasher, a cooker which was working and a watercooker. Everybody had to do kitchen work like cooking and cleaning in teams of four to five.The dining room was big enough for us but I think if it were completly full, booked with all 58 places instead of 30, it would be a little small.

In my opinion the sailing trip was awesome because it was trying but we had a lot of funny and interesting experiences.

Emil. 15

One day in Urk

Netherlands – One day in Urk

When my friends and I got out of your ship for 6 days, the Radboud, we first saw the little wall. It separated us from the Ijsselmeer and protexted us from it’s strong wind. Seven o us went, with the help of our navigation, in the direction of the small city.

We discovered many creepy dools, as well as a children’s shop with the name “Annabell”. Urk was almost deserted and a few girls were a little frightend.

 

In the centre we met other classmates. Together we decided to walk along the way to the stony beach. But not without stops. I bought my mum a little birthday present, someone else bought his sister a bag and so on. Arriving at the beach, some boys went swimming and we girls took photos of us.

 

In the early evening we went back to the ship. We were even punctual, in contrast to the teachers who were half an hour late.

 

Anne, 15

Why there should be more class trips.

If you are on a class trip, maybe your first thought is “Oh, no”, but when you are there it may be really good. It is really a lot of fun when you go through things together, and you can have very good experiences with or without your classmates. It could be a memory for you life. You grow togther with your class. Class trips also support independence. Yer important: You can see something new. Discover new people, culture, countries, food, languages, nature and of course experience many episodes.

 

Actually, you can learn something new. For example, when you are sailing and you have never done this before, you can learn it. You see, class trips have many advantages. And you learn solidarity, because when you are on a ship, you can’t go away when you have an argument, you must learn to clear conflicts.

 

Another advantage is that you don’t have school or homework and it is very good for pupils who can’t afford holidays. You see, if you enjoy it you can have a really great time.

Sophie 16